Müller-Thurgau

42 grapes — a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Grape Information

A cross of Riesling and Silvaner created by swiss Dr. Hermann Müller in an effort to bring the quality of Riesling to the productivity of Silvaner. Early ripening and very productive, the Müller-Thurgau has never been known for quality and is almost single-handedly responsible for the decline of Germany as a world power in fine wine production. Popular after WWII, Müller-Thurgau was blended with grape juice to make an overly sweet yet unremarkable wine that dominated Germany in the 1970s. Today it is being replanted with more aromatic varieties though it is still quite abundant.

Better examples of Müller-Thurgau come from the high vineyards in the Alto Adige region of northern Italy as well as New Zealand, where it was the most planted variety for years until it was taken over by Chardonnay and the more fashionable Sauvignon Blanc. Müller-Thurgau ripens so early that it has become the most important varietal in the northern areas of Switzerland and England. It can also be found around the Puget Sound area of Washington State

Grape Color

White

Statistics

2 wines
0 photos